Who Is Caring for The Caregiver?

Mary Ann cared for her parents until they died, and still had to be available to everyone else.
Mary Ann cared for her parents until they died, and still had to be available for everyone else.

   The numbers are staggering. According to an AARP study, the number of people 45-64 who can care for those 80 and older will drop by nearly half in the next fifteen years while the number of those 80 and older will increase by 80%. Today, with the rising cost of long-term and assisted care facilities, many are electing to provide care at home, yet most people go into it blind to the possibilities and pitfalls.

Caregiving can be both physically and emotionally challenging – AND it’s often the responsibility of one person, which can make it isolating as well. In addition to helping a loved one bathe and dress, juggling doctors’ appointments and managing a household, many caregivers must perform more complicated tasks typically completed by health care providers. Caregivers today manage multiple medications, intravenous fluids, wound care, post-surgical dressing changes, ostomy care and home dialysis. As more people are living longer, often with chronic health conditions, more responsibility falls on the caregiver. Stress is a constant.

Ok Now What? A Caregiver’s Guide to What Matters (Head to Wind Publishing, 2014) is an antidote to stress. It provides experience-based practical solutions to problems while offering strategies for self-care for the caregiver, including ways to schedule respite breaks and address issues like maintaining boundaries with family members — a proactive approach that helps prevent living in crisis mode. Who is Caring for the Caregiver? First and foremost, it must be the caregiver. OK Now What? A Caregiver’s Guide to What Matters walks them through it.

Caregiver awareness is still in its infancy, but the need is not. We would love the opportunity to be guests on your show to discuss this very timely topic and answer questions from the audience.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s