Seek Those in The Same Boat

People who are not in a caregiving situation, especially those who have never (or more likely not yet) experienced it, want to be sympathetic, want to help. But while you can accept their sympathy, even their help, there is nothing like talking with, being with, and sharing stories and tips with those who are currently in the same boat. Those people who are actively caregiving. Their situations may be slightly different from yours — their loved one has terminal cancer; yours is dealing with advanced Parkinsons disease, for example, or yours has Alzheimer’s while theirs has vascular dementia — they are in the trenches along with you. Seeking out those in similar current situations lets you know in a way that nothing else does: You are not alone!

The article (link below) details how caregivers can help support each other.971064c6-42b8-41c0-a373-b15010e84930

Caregiver.com

Advertisements

Simmering Family Issues in Caregiving

th-1
You can’t do it all. It’s not your fault!

It’s sometimes very difficult to step back into a family when you’ve purposely separated yourself  from them. When aging parents need help caring for themselves, but the relationship with them has been fraught and you or your siblings face making decisions when what you really want to do is hide from the whole thing to protect yourself, you have a few choices. OK Now What? A Caregiver’s Guide to What Matters (Head to Wind Publishing) offers succinct, practical suggestions for approaching this dilemma. The article ( link below) in caregiver.com offers much the same approach — helpful and practical without sidestepping the difficulties. It’s never easy, but remember: you’re not alone.

See the eight practical guidelines offered in the article.

 

via Unresolved Issues in Family Caregiving – Caregiver.com

Who Needs A Power of Attorney as Caregiver?

thOur book, OK Now What? A Caregiver’s Guide to What Matters (Head to Wind Publishing, 2014) details the Paperwork and Practicalities a caregiver needs to address when acting on behalf of a loved one.  Considering all the ramifications and specific legal needs of a person who is unable to care for themselves is difficult, but necessary. Making sure you are legally able to act on behalf of the person takes thought, care, and proper paperwork. The article in Caregiver.com offers points to consider.

Caregiver.com

Buy the book at Amazon

“Invisible” Caregiving

gary-sitting_webnewGary Barq’s memory of his Hungarian grandfather, who worked as a painting contractor in his own business until 80. When Gary’s grandfather developed Alzheimer’s the family who adored him, figured out a way to take care of him without destroying his dignity or their lives. It’s a touching story and one worth reading.  “Ok, We Go Now” – Caregiver.com

You can get copies of OK Now What? A Caregiver’s Guide to What Matters (Head to Wind Publishing) through caregiver.com or through amazon.com.

Caregiver Bookshelf

 There are a lot of ways to become a caregiver and as many ways that the experience varies from those of other caregivers. Which is why it can help to a several differently-targeted references at your fingertips.In addition to OK Now What? A Caregiver’s Guide to What Matters (of course), Caregiver.com and Today’s Caregiver magazine have some great options. Does your loved one struggle with chewing and swallowing?  Essential Puree’s recipes may help. For the most recent additions to Today’s Caregiver winners, check out the link below.

caregiver.com

Traveling With Alzheimer’s

45367045-group-of-senior-people-traveling-in-europeIt’s the time of year many of us are trying to figure out how to get away from jobs, routines, obligations and chores and take a much-needed rest in a new place. It can offer not only fun, but a new perspective.

But traveling can be work at the best of times: figuring out your plan, making arrangements and reservations, making sure you have the needed papers if you’re going to another country. It all adds excitement but also complication to the trip. Add to that someone for whom you are caring who has Alzheimer’s. It might seem like too much. But early stage Alzheimer’s doesn’t preclude travel, though it does add another set of factors to consider. The article with the link below offers tips.

caregiver.com